Every once in a while I look back through the vast archives or wedding images I’ve taken, totally in the hundreds of thousands. I sometimes look back all the way to my early days, before I owned a pro-level camera, when I was shooting film. You might mistake me for older photographer whose been shooting since the 70s right now, but my first wedding was 2012. Back then I was working full time as a manager of a printing lab in my town, and was completely obsessed with film photography, all the film stock choices out there and how they affected an image.

I had just bought a lovely little Nikon FM2N on eBay and a 35mm 1.4 lens to go on it (if I knew how good this lens was now I’d have kept it instead of selling it on a few months later), and wanted to test myself with a few rolls of film. I was second photographer to a friend who shot the main important images, whilst I had free roam to try out new techniques, learn the process and have the ability to make mistakes without affecting the wedding days final print volume. The venue was Cripps Barn near Bibury, if you haven’t heard of it they’re one of a string of beautiful barn wedding venues, and always booked up years in advance. The have a cute outside wedding spot, with log seats for the guests and a forest to walk through en route.

So why do I like this shot? It’s the first one in my wedding career that I look back on and feel was a defining image. I knew that choosing your film stock (what brand to use to load into the camera) would influence the outcome and feel of the picture, and my choice was spot on. Using Kodak Ektar 100 gave me lovely colour rendition, more than a digital camera can – soul over colour accuracy. The couple were so fantastic all day, and began the start of our bohemian and boutique styled wedding photography journey. Since then we’ve shot many more images, but nearly all on digital. Looking back at this picture has given us faith in the world of film photography, and we’re vowing to  bring our little Nikon film cameras to each and every wedding in 2017, to compile a film-only section of our website.